Change Is Hard

…but change is certain.

Mother's Day birds

13 Comments

My Mom always loved birds.  I have her bird book where she used to keep track of the birds she’d seen.  So I was excited when Mother’s Day here ended up being a big bird sighting day for me.

First up was a rose-breasted grosbeak.  I only see these beautiful birds a couple of times a year, always at my feeder.  They have black and white wings, a white chest and an absolutely beautiful rose colored bib. (click on the photo above to make it a little bigger.  He’s sitting over on the left side of the feeder)  I actually had two males at my feeder at the same time yesterday, then later in the afternoon as Katie and I sat in the sun on the deck one sat in the tree above us and sang.  I’ve never had the chance to listen to one before.  He was a very brave bird; he sat and sang even though Katie was going ballistic over a wayward chipmunk.  Once we went inside he popped back down to the feeder and sat there and ate for a long time.  Little pig.

I saw another one out at the park, up in a tree.  I’ve never seen one anywhere but at the feeder.  He was beautiful and I’d show you a picture of him out there if I could figure out how to import my photos to Adobe Photo-shop to crop the photo.

Then I hung the hummingbird feeder up  and though I didn’t see him I’m pretty sure I heard a hummer buzz past my head a few minutes later.

Earlier in the day I saw the little green heron fly through the back yard, the first sighting of the summer season.  We usually have one or two that nest behind our lot, back in the woods.  They make the worst noise as they come in for the evening, but they’re such cool birds I never mind.

I also saw a kingfisher over above the pond as Katie and I were driving to the park in the evening.  I rarely see one of those around here either, so that was an exciting thing to see.

And what was the most exciting, beautiful bird I saw yesterday?  Just as I was getting supper ready I walked past a window that overlooks the hummingbird feeder.  The sun was low in the west and the bright orange male oriole who was sitting on the pole drinking out of the ant moat above the feeder just glowed.  He stayed long enough, sipping at the water, for me to call my husband to see him, but not long enough for us to try to get a photo.  Trust me, he was absolutely gorgeous.  I have only seen one twice before, always first thing in the spring, and always checking out the hummingbird feeder.  I guess I need to get him some food of his own.  Soon.

So, given it was Mother’s Day, and given Mom loved seeing birds I’m thinking she just maybe sent them to visit me.   Anyway, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

Thanks Mom!

 

 

Author: dawnkinster

I'm a long time banker having worked in banks since the age of 17. I took a break when I turned 50 and went back to school. I graduated right when the economy took a turn for the worst and after a year of library work found myself unemployed. I was lucky that my previous bank employer wanted me back. So here I am again, a long time banker. Change is hard.

13 thoughts on “Mother's Day birds

  1. She did send them for you. She is happy you saw, enjoyed and shared them. 🙂

    Like

  2. With the overabundance of water this year, we are being treated to lots of songs of birds that we don’t often hear when we’re walking. I’m not good at getting their pictures though.

    Like

  3. Amazing. Your mom’s spirit was flying and singing all around you!

    Like

  4. That is so cool! What a gift on Mother’s Day! I love the first couple weeks of May when the migrants go through and almost anything can end up in your back yard!

    Like

  5. Lovely, lovely, lovely, Dawn! Those were special sightings for a special day, and you deserved every feathered visitor.

    Like

  6. I’m so happy for you, Dawn! Your mom is watching over you all the time!

    Like

  7. I think she is watching over you and just reminding you that she is close – and what a wonderful way to do it. I have been watching the most amazing red cardinal the last few days – he is brilliant scarlet color, much brighter in color then the ones I use to see in Minnesota. Now if only our little feather friends would sit still long enough for us to get photo’s of them!!!

    Like

  8. Of-course she sent them to visit! Joe’s mom loved cardinal’s and every year when the first one arrives I know she stopped by to check in and say, “How do you do.”

    Like

  9. I love watching the birds visit my feeders too. It sounds like you had a lot of great sightings! It really brings me a joy to feed and watch them that I didn’t expect when I bought them. I have the same butterfly stand holding my feeders in my yard.

    Like

  10. Grand Maw used to spend time with Dog Dad watching birds come to the bird feeder. Dad’s favorite birds were the little house sparrows.

    Essex & Deacon1

    Like

  11. My mom always loved bird watching, too. Still does a bit out in her yard. What a good idea for a mom’s day remembrance.

    How come you can’t get the photos into photoshop?

    Like

  12. don’t know Ellen, can’t figure it out. Too impatient I think

    Like

  13. Not that I’m behind or anything, but. . . . Does Photoshop have a “Get Photos” under edit or one of those things? Photoshop Elements (which is what I use) does, and I have it set up so as soon as I plug my card or camera in it opens and imports.
    I love the rose breasted Grosbeak – we get the evening and black-headed grosbeak here, often in large groups. When I am more diligent about keeping sunflower seeds in the feeders.

    Like

Leave a Reply to Ellen Finch Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.