Change Is Hard

…but change is certain.

How to hug a cello

26 Comments

image from the internet clipart


On my 2019 list of stupendous things to do is something I’ve been thinking about for years. And I figure if I don’t get to it soon it probably won’t ever happen.

Growing up there was a band program in our school system, but no orchestra. So, though my mom played violin, there wasn’t an option for any of us to play strings. And, truthfully, I never really had a hankering for the violin.

No, the sound I really enjoyed the few times I heard an orchestra play was the cello. That deep rich sound pulled at my heart. As a kid I thought maybe someday I’d learn to play one.

And now it’s fifty plus years later and I’ve never even touched a cello, which is why I decided to put “Find someone willing to teach me how to make a sound on a cello.” on the list.

Last week I talked to our local music store. They have cello teachers and will rent me a cello. Lessons are $25 to $35 dollars each. Renting the cello is $50 a month, a three month minimum.

I need to think about whether I want to expand my original idea of sitting with someone for a one time experience into three months of cello lessons.

My goal was to just experience what it was like to cradle a cello and pull a bow across the strings. I never thought I’d want to really learn how to play – it was more an experiential thing.

So…should I just put the word out and see if anyone knows of anyone who’d be willing to let me hug their cello? Or should I jump right in and spring for lessons and a cello to (temporarily) adopt for my very own?

I’m not home yet, I wrote this before we left for our trip and scheduled it to pop up while we’re gone. I’ll read your responses from wherever I am, but might not be able to acknowledge them.

I will make a decision when I get back from our trip….but I’m curious…what would be your vote?

Author: dawnkinster

I'm a long time banker having worked in banks since the age of 17. I took a break when I turned 50 and went back to school. I graduated right when the economy took a turn for the worst and after a year of library work found myself unemployed. I was lucky that my previous bank employer wanted me back. So here I am again, a long time banker. Change is hard.

26 thoughts on “How to hug a cello

  1. You might as well give it a try. Who knows you might have found a new passion. I’ve been thinking I should take guitar lessons again. I stopped when my youngest sister could play better than me and she was, at the time, taking ukulele lessons.

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  2. The frugal gal in me says, ‘Pay how much for what?!’ But the adventurer in me says, ‘Heck, yeah!! If not now, when? Go for it!’

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  3. Dawn, you know me — I vote Jump right in, without delay!! Look, this is something you’ve always wanted to do, right? What better time to do it? Who knows, you might find a community orchestra to join! FYI: if you’ve got a college nearby with a music department, you might email its head, explain what you’re looking for, and ask if there’s a cello student willing to let you hug their instrument (and perhaps give you a couple of lessons on the cheap). That’s what I did with my flute, and I’ll never regret it. Good luck!!

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    • You know, every time I think about you playing your flute I smile. Good ideas. I will contact my band director who knows all the music directors in this school system. Someone might be willing. Even a high school student might be fine.

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      • Absolutely! Even a high school student has been playing for four or more years (plus, it’d be good for them — we learn the best when we teach others). Do it!

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  4. Have you seen the movie “Truly Madly Deeply? Fabulous British romance that features a wonderful soundtrack based on a piano cello duet. To. Die. For.

    Here’s what I’d do.

    Go to a high school, make friends with the music teacher. Tell the teacher about your desire to just once, experience that wonderful sound of the cello. While you’re at it, see if you can try out the bassoon – another beauty that “pulls at the heart.”

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    • I’m already friends with a middle school band director who happens to direct our community band, and she’s friends with all the high school band teachers and most of the students…so there’s maybe a lead…thanks for the idea.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m not sure, but I might do a one-time hands on and see how it felt, then decide about lessons.

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    • Maybe try the obo first, just saying.

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      • LOL. Oboe is another wishful thought. I play clarinet and always wanted to play oboe…my husband actually bought me a student version and I’ve tried a few times. I thought it would be more like clarinet and it’s not really. The fingers are so much further apart, and the reed is so HARD to blow through! I need to continue trying though.

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  6. GO FOR IT!!!! MY husband took up violin in his late 60’s and loves it, and plays with a man who took up cello in his 70’s. If you need inspiration read this.. Ari Goldman took up cello as an adult after giving up as a child. https://www.amazon.com/Late-Starters-Orchestra-Ari-Goldman/dp/156512992X You can do it!

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  7. Imagine three months of hugs. At the end you’ll either be in love or ready to part as friends.
    Sounds like a bargain.

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  8. I would visit a music store for the hugging:0 I have a Grandson who play the Cello…he is very good and enjoys it very much:)

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I think the music store here will let you come in and just hug (or try) a string instrument or piano, or guitar.

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  10. Yep, go! I might think the sound of the cello, with it touching you, would be magical. Ok, I might have to go do this too. 🙂

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