Change Is Hard

…but change is certain.

Davis Lake Overlook meander

23 Comments

To me, the woods are always filled with wonder and mystery.


Saturday I went on a guided walk, of a park that Katie and I have explored quite a bit. She and I especially like it in the fall, but midsummer turned out to be pretty interesting too, especially when the guide was the person who manages the natural preserves in our township. (You can click on any image and make it larger for more detail.)

I don’t know what this is, was low to the ground, blossom was about the size of a nickle. One blossom on each side of the stem. Do you know what it is?

No, Katie didn’t get to go, it would have been too hard for her anyway, and she’d have been a distraction to all the rest of our group. Plus she wasn’t invited, but don’t tell her that!

Our guide told us the name of this, now I can’t remember. Should have taken notes.

I went back to the park on Monday with my camera to capture a few of the things we saw that I thought were spectacular.

Our guide showed us orange lillies. We didn’t see this particular group on Saturday, it was out in full force on Monday morning, just a few feet from where he showed us lilies, but on the other side of the trail.

Specifically I went back to visit a beautiful field of prairie plants. This year the predominant flowers are black-eyed susan but our guide said next year it will probably be something else as plants get established.

A sea of yellow against that blue sky.

It sure was stunning!

Do you see the little inch worm?

Monday I had blue skies with clouds moving in. I’m always happy with sky like that.

I confess I also walked down to a part of the park that isn’t open to the public. They are working there to make it ready for public use, but it’s not quite there yet and there aren’t paths worked out.

This is a small glacier lake, surrounded by beautiful uplands and wetlands.

I followed where we had walked on Saturday because I really wanted some shots of the little lake back there. Don’t tell them, I scurried down and back quickly so as not to break the rules for very long. And because the flies and mosquitoes were horrible!

Water lilies rest quietly near the shore.

I hope you enjoyed your visit to one of Katie’s parks, she says next time I go I better take her with me! I also made it to the park recommended by one of my fellow nature walkers. I’ll be working on those photos next. Stay tuned.

A walk in the woods is always a good thing.

And meanwhile, get outside and take a walk. It’s absolutely gorgeous out there and we can all use some gorgeous in our lives.

Speaking of gorgeous…

Author: dawnkinster

I'm a long time banker having worked in banks since the age of 17. I took a break when I turned 50 and went back to school. I graduated right when the economy took a turn for the worst and after a year of library work found myself unemployed. I was lucky that my previous bank employer wanted me back. So here I am again, a long time banker. Change is hard.

23 thoughts on “Davis Lake Overlook meander

  1. Sounds great – I do need to go take a walk 😉 Nice photos!

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  2. That little inchworm looks like he has some growing to do to live up to his name.

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  3. I haven’t seen tiger lilies in so long. I miss the North more and more every year!

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  4. Michigan Lily! Aren’t they great? They’re so vibrant and unfortunately, short-lived.
    After you find out what some of the other mysteries are, let us know.
    The Facebook group Michigan wildlife identification (the one you recently joined) can help, and they’ll also suggest plant identification apps.

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    • They sure are beautiful. Good idea putting the plants question to the Michigan wildlife group. I got an answer on the pink flower from the hike leader (I sent a photo to him with the question) It’s called moth mullein. He said it’s a weed but not very invasive. He said it comes in yellow too.

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  5. Michigan Lily!
    Your Facebook group of Michigan nature identification can help identify the mystery flowers and suggest a good app for plant identification.

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  6. How I love the Susans and the water lilies — Dawn, you have such pretty scenery where you are! I must confess, I’d thought about the skeeters and hoped you’d splashed in eau de DEET first! Won’t breathe a word to Katie, though I bet she gave you one sniff and knew you’d been cheating on her, ha!

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  7. Absolutely BEAUTIFUL!! I Love all your photos, oh my, so envious of the beauty of the park. I agree, get outside and feel, smell, see and hear nature and her grandeur! ❤️❤️❤️

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  8. Such beautiful images. The lilies are amazing how they grow with petals pushed back.

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  9. What a place! Fields, flowers, water. Beautiful.

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    • I know! Usually when Katie and I go there we don’t get to the back of the park, too far and too many hills for her. But even the first part, the woods and the hills is beautiful, and that’s where the lilies were. In the spring there are lots of spring wildflowers in that part too. The big field of black-eyed susans was planted by the park department and is stunning this year.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Hi, Dawn – I was just browing local hikes for tomorrow. I would love to do that one. I wish that it was close!

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  11. So lovely to see your photos of the woods. Haven’t been anywhere like that in months and should I ever get near one again I won’t take it for granted. I especially like the orange lilies. Around here we call them ditch lilies… because that’s where they grow.

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  12. It was a lovely visit, and the little glacial lake is very sweet. Thanks, Dawn!

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  13. Pingback: Exploring a new park | Change Is Hard

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